Study in Canada? Make a life in Canada!

Why choose Canada for your higher studies? There are many potential reasons and for some students, Canada won’t be the best choice. But if making a new life abroad is high on the list of factors, Canada almost certainly should be on the short list of your most attractive choices.


A recent official government report published June 23, 2021 is entitled International students as a source of labour supply: Transition to permanent residency Canada’s International Student Strategy - Young People for a Growing Economy. The authors reporting from Statistics Canada explore the strong interest by Canadian policy makers in growing the Canadian economy and population through immigration from international students. This policy focus has been met with similarly massive interest in Canadian higher studies from students worldwide who see a wide range of attractions in Canada. Even for students who are not sure they are interested to migrate to Canada, the prospect of a Post Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) of up to 3 years and variety of pathways to Permanent Residence (PR), make Canada, and its vibrant, diversified economy a secure selection in which to pursue overseas study.


The report summary states:

International students are increasingly viewed as a promising pool of skilled individuals who can be tapped for participation in the Canadian labour market. This is a key motivating factor for providing international students with pathways to obtain permanent residency. . . . Higher levels of earnings from employment while studying or after graduation are associated with an increased likelihood of transition to permanent residency.

What does this mean if you are thinking of studying in Canada? If making a new life abroad and Canada is to your liking, it is the country in the world with the most developed and focussed strategy on growing its population and economy through immigration, and especially immigration from international students. The Canadian focus on international students is not temporary and it is not short-term. The success of this strategy has every likelihood of being a major part of Canadian strategy long into the future.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Youjin Choi and Feng Hou are with the Social Analysis and Modelling Division, Analytical Studies Branch, at Statistics Canada. Eden Crossman is with the Research and Evaluation Branch at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.Report reference: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/36-28-0001/2021006/article/00002-eng.htm Comments or questions can be sent to blog@cuac.ca



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